Monthly Archives: April 2017

My Mountain Bike Have Bike Disc Brakes

A mountain bike is a bicycle that is designed specifically for mountain biking, either on dirt trails or on other unpaved environments. Mountain bikes are different from regular bikes in a number of ways.

First, they have wide and knobby tires for extra traction and shock absorption.

Also, most mountain bikes are fitted with bar ends on the handlebars. However, with the increase in the popularity of riser handlebars, fewer riders now tend to use bar end extensions.

There are basically four different classifications of mountain bikes.

1. Fully rigid- Fully rigid mountain bikes have a frame which has a rigid fork and fixed rear with no suspension.

2. Hard tail- Hard tail mountain bikes have a frame with no rear suspension, and these bikes are usually used with front suspension.

3. Soft tail- Soft tail mountain bikes have a frame with a small amount of rear suspension, but activated by the flex of the frame instead of by the pivots.

4. Dual or full suspension- Dual or full suspension mountain bikes have a frame with a front suspension fork and rear suspension with a rear shock and linkage that makes the rear wheel move on pivots.

Mountain Bike Disc Brakes

There are many key components on the typical mountain bike. One of the most critical components of a mountain bike is the mountain bike disc brakes. Mountain bike disc brakes are featured on most new mountain bike models. Mountain bike disc brakes offer much improved stopping power over the previously used rim brakes.

Mountain bike disc brakes also work much better under adverse conditions. This is because they are located at the center of the wheel. Unlike rim brakes, they remain drier and cleaner than other rims. Although there are many advantages to mountain bike disc brakes, there are some disadvantages as well. They tend to weigh more and are often more expensive as well.

Maintenance on disc brakes also tends to be more difficult and costly. This is especially true of hydraulic disc brakes, which work by moving brake fluid through a hose or line to squeeze the pads together.

It is very important to make sure that your brakes are in as proper working condition. This means you need to take your bike in to your local bike shop and get a full inspection at least once a month. This will not only ensure that your brakes and the rest of the parts on your bike last as long as they possibly can, but more importantly that you can feel safe riding on a bike that you know is safe and secure and which will be able to properly handle those rugged and steep hills.

The Best Folding Mountain Bike

If you need to stick to your principles and quite simply can not or will not sacrifice what your stand for then Rietti’s latest addition to the world of folding bikes (or more specifically the ‘Army recon’ style of folding mountain bikes) has got your name written all over it.

In your case money may or not be an option or it just may be a case of refusing to compromise your ideals. Let’s face it what you drive or what you ride says a lot about who you are; there’s just no getting around that in today’s society. Personally I always have been and always will be a sports car kind of guy. My sports car is my identity and it says as much about me as does my leather jacket, my watch, my sneaker collection and my girlfriend. It’s sleek, stylish, fast, changes gears and changes pace in a hurry and on the fly and maneuvers in and out of traffic and around current and potential obstacles in the blink of an eye. If I want to get downtown from my office on the outskirts of the city then I just crank up some classic ‘Prodigy’ on my top of the line stereo system and I’m there in twenty minutes.

Now what does this have to do with an Army Recon folding mountain bike you ask… Everything.

I’m about as likely to trade in my sports car for a truck, van, station wagon, family sedan or even an SUV as I am to start wearing corduroys and Dockers or boat shoes and crocs; it’s just not going to happen, not now, not later, not ever. My sports car defines my style and YES style matters, it’s who I am and how I relate to my world.

Now personal history tells me lots of people either don’t know what they want and who they are or are too willing to compromise those things without a moment’s hesitation. I can speak from personal experience. Some years back before I’d discovered the world of mountain bikes never mind the folding mountain bike or better yet the Army Recon folding mountain bike by Rietti I bought an Eagle Talon. Now being a bit of a trend setter and possessing a clear sense of personal style I also, before the fad, picked up a thin, supple lambskin button up ¾ black leather jacket on a business trip to London, England. Although I was the first of my friends to own both a black leather jacket of this cut and style and also the first to buy an Eagle Talon I would not be the last. Shortly afterwards two of my friends proceeded to buy the coat and the car and then there were three.

Now for me my Eagle Talon served my purposes perfectly. It had decent gas mileage for a high performance machine, was relatively easy to park, could comfortably take one passenger (my girlfriend) and was uncomfortable enough to discourage unwelcome, tag-a-longs thanks to the microscopic back seat. Also importantly the back seat folded down and I could remove the wheels from my Kona ‘Lavadome’ mountain bike and although somewhat dirty and somewhat inconvenient in the days prior to folding mountain bikes I was able to take my mountain bike on regular off-roading weekend adventures. As for my two friends, well, six months after buying an Eagle Talon they traded it in for an SUV, a mortgage and a white picket fence with the wife and 2.5 kids. Of course I’m exaggerating for effect but it does make me wonder if some people really know what they’re looking for if they’re willing to change their mind faster than I change gears.

Now to be honest I’m not much of a gearhead or even much of an extreme/adrenaline athlete or enthusiast and I’m not keen on adding more war scars like the ones I picked up in the year that I squeezed my mountain bike into the back seat of my sports car. You see long before the good people at Rietti designed their Army Recon folding mountain bike, a weekend warrior had to compensate for the lack of a suitable folding mountain bike by folding his backseat instead.

While I sold my Eagle Talon long ago and my Kona mountain bike is somewhere in Thailand at my father’s house the endearing message is the necessity of a folding mountain bike versus a standard issue mountain bike; especially one that is durable, reliable and delivers performance and style like the Army Recon folding bike from Rietti. I choose to travel light on my life journey now and neither my mother nor my sister has any extra storage space in their Vancouver apartment so your typical non-folding mountain bike struggles in this scenario. It appears that as big, beautiful and untamed as Canada’s outdoors may be nobody downtown or in the suburbs has any space to spare these days.

Now let’s talk a bit more about Rietti’s folding mountain bike. While I’m not the type brave or crazy enough to buy a racing motorcycle or even a high performance road bicycle (like my friend who snapped his collarbone last weekend), I’ve got no interest in an SUV in terms of gas prices, highway performance or environmental consequences and I’m not about to stick a roof rack on my sports car, it doesn’t mean I don’t harbor a fantasy or two of my own.

Hill Climbing on a Mountain Bike

Mountain bike riding is a popular pastime and sport for many Americans. According to the National Bicycle Dealers Association, 28.5 percent of the bicycles sold by specialty bicycle shops in 2008 were mountain bikes. But it is a good bet that few of these riders consider actual mountain bike climbing to be their favorite part of the sport.

Climbing hills, particularly steep hills, is an activity that most riders approach with dread. They know from hard, painful, sometimes humiliating experience that mountain bike climbing leads to the agony of defeat much more often than it leads to the thrill of victory. With the right strategy, however, hill climbing can be done efficiently, without causing undue hardship to the bike or to the body.

Three Ingredients of a Successful Bike Climb

Biking enthusiast Ken Kifer says that there are three ingredients of successful mountain bike climbing:

1. Physical strength of the rider
2. Proper gear selection for the climb
3. Hill climbing strategy employed

Assuming that most people who participate in such a rugged sport as mountain biking are physically fit, the first ingredient should not pose too great an issue. If it is a problem, some rough and tumble rides up and down various hills for a few weeks should eliminate this obstacle.

Items 2 and 3, however, are not quite so easy to master. However, before these aspects are even attempted, one must choose the correct type of bike

Choosing the Correct Type of Bike

There’s a vast difference between a road bike and a mountain bike and not knowing this difference-and perhaps making the wrong choice-can make mountain bike climbing nearly impossible.

In general, one can tell the difference between a road bike and a mountain bike by considering two factors-the framing and tires of the bikes.

Framing.

Because road bikes are built for speed, they typically have lighter frames than do mountain bikes. By contrast, the heavier frames of mountain bikes house suspension systems that are built to withstand the frame-jarring shocks of rough terrains.

Tires.

Road bikes have thinner, smoother tires. The tires of mountain bikes, however, are broad with a significant amount of traction to handle rough terrains.

The Final Ingredients

The final two ingredients-proper gear selection and hill climbing strategy-are indispensable parts of each other. Both are essential ingredients of successful mountain bike climbing. Both involve strategy. And the uses of both are dependent on the different types of hills.

Mountain Bike Climbing Up Different Types of Hills

Most hills or mountains fall into three categories. Each category brings its own unique set of challenges. But each different type of hill can be conquered-with the proper strategy.

1.The concave hill is steepest as the top. Such a hill appears to get taller as the rider approaches.
2. A convex hill is steepest at the bottom. This type of a hill appears to get shorter as the rider approaches.
3. An even grade hill has a sloped, even rise.

To make mountain bike climbing even more challenging, some hills can be a combination of all three types and some can be part of a series of hills. Some can even be mountains. The strategies for climbing the different types of hills must be considered in relation to whether one is climbing an isolated hill, a series of hills, or a mountain, as the strategy is different for each.

This article will address the strategy for mountain bike climbing up an isolated hill.

Climbing an Isolated Hill

An isolated hill is one that “stands alone” without any surrounding hills. The strategy employed in climbing same will depend upon whether the hill is convex or concave.

Convex Hills.

Climbing any hill takes power and speed, two components that must gradually be increased upon approaching a hill. For a convex hill (one that is steeper at the bottom), the timing and the speed of the ascent must be nearly perfect. As odd as it may sound, the way to accelerate up a convex hill is to shift down. This provides more power for the climb. But timing is everything when using this method. Downshift too soon, and exhaustion will plague the rider even before reaching the hill. Downshift too late, and climbing the hill can be too labor intensive.

Concave Hills.

Concave hills are steeper at the apex and, as such, require a different strategy than do convex hills. Two key factors to this strategy are keeping the speed steady, thus conserving energy, at the start the climb. As the hill becomes steeper, the downshifting should begin.

Another strategy to mountain bike climbing of a concave hill is to stand up on the pedals, which creates a more powerful cycle. When standing, make sure the full body is evenly distributed on both pedals. This will create sufficient power to overcome the hill.

A Few Tips for General Technique

One’s pedaling technique is also an important factor in successful mountain bike climbing. The right placement of the feet can have a huge impact on the amount of effort expended while climbing the hill. The feet should be positioned properly and the heel should be kept parallel to the ground. (If the toes are pointed down, the muscular contractions of the leg are minimized which will affect the speed and the stamina of the rider.)

Another point to consider is the cadence of the ride. (Cadence is the number of times that the pedal is rotated, on either side, per minute of cycling.) Aiming for a steady cadence is a healthy goal, whether the surface is flat or is on a hill. Cycling at a cadence of 85 to 105 is an optimum level.

When mountain bike climbing, one’s power to climb the hill will be increased at a higher cadence while downshifting to a lower gear. The effort on the pedal, however, should remain the same on both the upstroke and the down stroke. Maintaining the same amount of pressure throughout the whole pedaling cycle will create a more even stroke, which can help to maintain the energy level needed to climb the hill.

How I Got Into Mountain Biking

It was a humid Saturday morning as I had one foot clipped into my mountain bike while there must have been thirty of us lined up onto the starting line of this 15 mile mountain bike race. As I stood there I glanced over at the other competitors, some of whom had what looked like a ball of fire in their eyes while others had ripped leg muscles. They all sat onto their bikes, some of witch were carbon fiber bikes, hard tail and full suspension bikes and even a few 29ers. Here I am with only a year of experience riding on single track trails with my Trek full suspension mountain bike as I tried to keep myself pumped up for what could potentially be a very grueling race. Before the gunshot was heard, I kept my hands relaxed on the handle bar grips, only letting go to make sure my gloves were on tight, my helmet was adjusted properly and I took a few sips from the Camelbak hydration system that was strapped to me. Once the gun went off and was heard all over the mountain bike park, we were all in a dash to leave the starting line while clipping in and jockeying for position like a herd of wild animals as we made our way from the open field and into the single track trails. As I kept changing gears, looking around at the riders in front of me and thinking about what I would encounter during the race, I had a thought in the back of my mind.

I thought about what led me to buy a mountain bike, how long would it take before I would become confident enough to ride through rugged terrain, switchback trails and steep hills. Could this new sport help me out in the other endurance sports that I compete in?

“Mountain Bike Trips”

With the background of a distance runner, and a triathlete, mountain biking would definitely benefit me. A little more than a year and a half before this race, a friend convinced me to buy an inexpensive hard tail mountain bike to participate in group rides in the winter time where we would be doing a lot hill repeats on a twenty mile loop on pavement. These workouts would keep us in shape through the winter so we would all be better off for the upcoming triathlon season. Once springtime rolled around and I wanted to get into ridding on single track trails that offer switchbacks, rugged terrain and steep hills, I realized that the bike that I currently had was inadequate for this type of ridding. So then I found myself buying a Trek full suspension mountain bike. The more I rode my new bike at the local mountain bike parks, the more I appreciated having an intermediate level bike. He way the dual suspension was forgiving on the terrain of the trails along with how well the tires gave me enough traction through the different trail conditions were just a couple of key features that I began to appreciate about this bike. As I rode my mountain bike on the easy and intermediate trails, I not only realized that I was turning into a better mountain biker, I noticed something else along the way. When I was not making my way though the local mountain bike parks, I was out on the road on my triathlon bike. What I found out about mountain biking is that it forces you to become very good at being able to handle your bike in all different situations. It is that same requirement in mountain biking that made me more confident when riding on road, especially through a village where there are a lot of cars, traffic lights, potholes and other various problems that a cyclist has to be aware of. At the time, while I was still becoming acclimated to this bike that I had bought, I knew that sometime in the future I would like to try a mountain bike race. I also knew that I would have to become a much better mountain biker at this new discipline before I try to do it at a competitive level. I soon found myself waking up very early on a September morning to join a of friends on what was going to be a sixty mile ride on our bikes. We would ride the first thirty five miles on a flat trail and then stop for breakfast and then the fun would really begin. Then twenty five miles of singe track trails and see who could endure the most pain. As the leaves fell off the trees and the snow blanketed the ground, there was yet another opportunity for me. Mountain biking on the snow packed trails while breathing the dry air and trying not to let my tires lose their grip in the snow. Eventually in the middle of the summer, I found myself on vacation visiting a friend in Massachusetts near the New Hampshire border and we mountain biked at various parks in the area. My friend and I rode in parks that offered an endless amount of rocks, boulders, roots, logs, man made bridges over creeks and even a few mosquitoes! At this time I was confident enough in my bike handling that I had registered for my first mountain bike race.

Now here I was in the first of four laps in this grueling mountain bike race while I was thinking about how I got into the sport instead of thinking about the race itself. I was quickly getting exhausted while I tried to keep up with the more experienced athletes in this race. With beads of sweat already dripping down my face and realizing that my mental toughness was slowly fading away, this discipline was beginning to feel a lot harder than distance running and competing in triathlons. I found myself on trails that meandered through the park as well as steep climbs, a few rollers, roots, logs, some rocks and then an open field to have a chance to gain speed. Overall I didn’t finish as well as I wanted to, but I plan to compete in more mountain bike races in the future. With the various mountain bike parks around the country, this is a very rewarding sport for a beginner to get into as well as an experienced mountain biker. Both types of mountain bikers will still reap the benefits and enjoyment, while continuously trying to push themselves past their comfort zone.